Japan responds

As we have noted in our written material several times since the Chinese authorities buckled last August under the weight of enormous domestic capital outflows, when China accounts for approximately 20% of your exports and 25% of your imports you have to respond… and respond the Bank of Japan did. Initially by suggesting the imposition of capital controls in China and now with firm action by a shift to negative interest rates.

The Bank of Japan has set itself the target of 2% inflation – despite QE amounting to 15% of GDP annually that has left them holding 26% of the stock of outstanding Japanese government debt (up from just 7% in early 2013). Japanese core inflation (Inflation excluding food and tax effects) still stands at a meagre 0.1%.

What’s going wrong?

Well, quite simply, that QE doesn’t work in Japan in the way you might argue it works elsewhere.

Here’s the picture:

Firstly, injections of monetary liquidity – through asset purchases – are offset entirely by a decline in the velocity of circulation of money – in short, more money does less, leaving you where you started.

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Secondly, the liquidity injected simply ends up in the “current account” at the Bank of Japan – that is to say, banks hold the cash in the form of mountainous reserves at the central bank.

The level of current account deposits at the Bank of Japan stands at a mind-boggling Yen 253 trillion (up 42% y/y) – that is approximately half of GDP.

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The Japanese system is incomparably awash with liquidity and one strong product of that has been a sharply weaker yen (the effect on equity prices and subsequent wealth effect on consumption – the transmission channel for QE in the USA – is negligible when Japanese households have just 10% of their assets in equities versus 53% in cash). The channel through which Japanese QE works – and Japanese QE is on a scale that dwarves that in any other country besides China (where state-approved bank balance sheet expansion effectively replicates QE) – is through an explicit policy to drive the yen down and thereby import some inflation whilst giving Japanese exporters a bit of a boost.

However, along come the Chinese in the middle of the largest credit bubble in history and throw a “spanner in the works” with a weaker yuan.

The yen has appreciated approximately 12% against the yuan since last August. That hurts. It hurts a lot and is a substantial headwind for Japanese QE.

The only thing to do, according to the Bank of Japan right now, is make interest rates negative and force that Yen 253 trillion of liquidity out into the economy via bank lending.

Why? Because the appreciation of the yen is pushing inflation the wrong way, if left unchallenged Japan will slip back into core deflation very quickly.

Core inflation responds with about a ten month lag to the exchange rate.

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Moreover, the exchange rate impacts the output gap (gap between actual and potential output) and that also drives inflation.

An appreciating exchange rate turns the output gap negative and that pushes down on inflation.

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So, easy to see why the Bank of Japan responded. They said it was to encourage banks to lend those reserves, but we know better.

It’s just the first little warning shot in an open currency fight with the Chinese.

With the yuan under severe pressure as a consequence of persistent and ongoing domestic capital flight, and a devaluation of 20%+ extremely likely, it’s just the start. The Bank of Japan will, in due course, be stepping up its bond purchases and pushing rates further into negative territory in a determined – and ultimately successful – effort to drive the yen down sharply.

More fuel to the global deflationary fire.

 

MONOGRAM CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Severe Stress

We have written at length, and in great detail, over the last nine months about the stresses in the Chinese banking system and the threat to both Chinese and global stability.

As if more proof were needed the following chart, showing the volume of interbank lending in China, illustrates the extent of the pressure on a banking system that is enormously over-extended in an economy that is overleveraged and with extreme overvaluation in equities, real estate, and increasingly, government bonds (10 year government bonds currently yielding less than one percentage point more than US 10 year government bonds).

Yes, in November 2015 (latest data) Chinese interbank lending hit Yuan 8769 billion (or Yuan 8.8 trillion, about $1.4 trillion)

2016.1.07.severestress

In year on year terms the level of lending has exploded.

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Now, interbank lending has typically been a way for Chinese banks to get around PBOC (People’s Bank of China) restrictions on balance sheet growth and leverage (loans can be made via other banks and are off balance sheet and circumvent loan/deposit ratio limits and capital requirements). The PBOC has tried on several occasions to address this loophole in the structure of regulations to little or no effect.

The enormous increase in interbank lending can only mean the following: the banking system is creaking under the strain of capital flight and tightening domestic liquidity conditions and that bad loans must be piling up at an alarming rate.

How should banks respond to this sort of scenario? Well, look at US banks after the subprime crisis. US banks reduced their credit market debt outstanding by approximately $3 trillion between the end of 2008 and the end of 2015. They reduced debt to add approximately $1 trillion in equity. Eminently sensible – swap debt for equity and deleverage.

What have Chinese banks actually done? Well, step forward anyone who wants Chinese bank equity… I don’t see a crowd. So, the Chinese response has been to increase bank leverage (when they are talking about deleveraging the system). Extremely worrying.

Consider that the balance sheet of Chinese depository corporations (“banks”) is $31 trillion, or three times Chinese GDP, and has quadrupled since the global credit crisis began in 2008. There you begin to see just how important Chinese banks are – they have a balance sheet equivalent to 30% of global GDP. Moreover, they are very inefficient lenders. In the last four quarters alone they expanded their balance sheets by $4.3 trillion when Chinese GDP grew just $0.5 trillion… which means just one thing, lots and lots of bad/non-performing loans in the pipeline.

And, for all those who think the Chinese can use their $3.3 trillion in foreign reserves to bail out the banks, perhaps the following information might be helpful. Assuming just 20% of Chinese bank assets are non-performing at peak (and that number is very, very modest by historical Chinese standards) and with a 50% recovery rate, you write off $3 trillion for the banks (0.2 * $31 trillion = $6.2 trillion and 0.5 * $6.2 trillion = $3.1 trillion). A relatively benign credit event cleans out PBOC reserves (assuming there is no further flight). If you think those FX reserves give the PBOC ample firepower to hold up their banking system then you are possibly guilty of wishful thinking and blind optimism.

Keeping to the USD peg, keeping real rates high enough to stem the capital outflow, deleveraging the financial system and keeping the economy motoring? These are impossibly incompatible objectives. Only one way out (as we highlighted many months back) – a significant decline in the Yuan (20% plus) that exports all of China’s problems to Japan and the West in a deflationary tsunami.

 

MONOGRAM CAPITAL MANAGEMENT